Study: Scant Evidence That Medical Pot Helps Most Illnesses

Medical-Marijuana-leafCHICAGO (AP) — A big research analysis says medical marijuana has not been proven to work for many illnesses for which state laws have approved it.

The analysis found the strongest evidence is for chronic pain and for muscle stiffness in multiple sclerosis. But the authors say evidence is weak for many other conditions, including anxiety, sleep disorders, and Tourette’s syndrome.

The analysis evaluated 79 studies involving more than 6,000 patients. It’s published in Tuesday’s Journal of the American Medical Association.

A separate study tested edible medical marijuana products and found many labels don’t accurately list amounts of the active ingredients. More than half had lower than listed amounts but some had higher than listed amounts.

 

NSEA: NP Public Schools Want Teachers to Check with Parents Before Reporting Neglect/Abuse

nseaBy Karin Kilgarin, NSEA

NORTH PLATTE, June 22, 2015 – Teachers should not be required to “check with parents” before reporting suspected child abuse or neglect to law enforcement or the Department of Health and Human Services, according to the North Platte Education Association (NPEA).

North Platte Public School teacher Christie Copper and guidance counselor Stephen Spiehs were recently told by school district administrators that it was a “mistake” to make such a report without first contacting the child’s parents, and that in the future parents are to be contacted before making such a report unless the child is “in immediate danger.”

Because school administrators and the North Platte Board of Education refused the teachers’ request that the directive be withdrawn, the NPEA is seeking a ruling on the matter from the Lincoln County District Court.

“Reporting suspected child abuse or neglect is not only our responsibility as teachers, it is the law,” said Copper, president of the NPEA.

Copper and Spiehs are named as plaintiffs in the lawsuit, along with NPEA member teachers.

School administrators refused jan informal request from Copper and Spiehs that the directive be withdrawn. When a formal grievance was filed, administrators threatened them with insubordination, which can result in disciplinary action up to, and including, being fired. The NPEA then asked the North Platte Board of Education to retract the reprisals and confirm that the school district practice is to not condition the reporting of suspected child abuse or neglect upon the contact of parents. Board members refused to retract the administration’s directive, which led the NPEA to seek a court ruling.

District’s Directive Contrary to State Law

Copper noted that she, Spiehs and the NPEA followed the grievance process outlined in the negotiated agreement with the school district.

“The decision to seek a court ruling was not made lightly. The issue of protecting children from abuse or neglect is of paramount importance to NPEA teacher-members,” said Copper. “Our teachers are committed to the issue of student safety.”

Scott Norby, attorney for the NPEA, said the lawsuit will address two important issues:  The statutory obligation of school employees to report suspected child abuse or neglect; and the ability of teachers to present grievances under the negotiated grievance procedure without fear of reprisal.

“The school district’s directive that teachers are to inform parents prior to submission of a report to law enforcement or the Department of Health and Human Services unless a child is in immediate danger is contrary to Nebraska law and potentially places children in danger,” said Norby. “The facts in this case illustrate why it is imperative that teachers have the ability to present grievances under the negotiated grievance procedure without fear of reprisal.”

The Facts

On a morning in late March, Copper and Spiehs were supervising students when alerted by paraeducators that a student had arrived at school with a red scratch on the right side of his face, unkempt hair and a black, soot-like dirt on the left side of his face. He had dried, smelly feces on his palms, wrists and fingernails, presented very tired behavior and was licking his hands and rubbing his eyes excessively.

When milk was offered, he appeared thirsty and drank it very quickly. He also was very hungry and wanted cereal.

Based on their personal observation of the student, Copper and Spiehs determined they had an obligation under state law and school policy to report the student’s condition to the Department of Health and Human Services. They contacted the school resource officer and, upon arrival, he assessed the situation.

During this time, the school principal, associate principal and secondary special education coordinator were in and out of the room with the child and were aware of the situation. Spiehs contacted the Department of Health and Human Services.

Early that afternoon, the principal sent an email to Copper and Spiehs saying he had heard from the child’s parent who was “extremely displeased.”

In his email, the principal also wrote that it was a mistake to report the suspected abuse or neglect without first contacting the parents. He admonished the employees that in future cases of suspected abuse or neglect the student’s parents should be contacted first if a student is not in immediate danger.

Copper and Spiehs met with the principal to ask him to retract the admonishment and to confirm a school employee’s right and statutory obligation to report suspected child abuse or neglect without first contacting parents. The principal declined the request.

A few days later, NPPS Superintendent Larry Ramaekers approached Copper after school and indicated that it was a mistake to report the suspected child abuse or neglect without first contacting the parents. Ramaekers also refused to retract the directive and admonishment. During a meeting with Copper, Spiehs and district administrators to address the grievance, Ramaekers accused Copper and Spiehs of insubordination in their handling of the report to the Department of Health and Human Services and threatened to take disciplinary action against them.

Chilling Effect

The NPEA believes that the email issued by the school principal; the comments made by the Superintendent; the refusal to retract the directive and admonishment that school employees are to contact parents first when reasonable cause exists to believe a student has been subjected to abuse or neglect; are all contrary to state law and school policy.

The NPEA also believes those actions constitute retribution for complying with the requirement of state law and school policy; and are intended to chill and intimidate staff from reporting cases of suspected abuse or neglect.

To resolve the issues, a Complaint for Declaratory and Injunctive Relief has been filed with the Lincoln County District Court and an Unfair Labor Practice lawsuit has been filed with the Nebraska Commission of Industrial Relations.

Letter from Principal Danny McMurtry

Filing in Lincoln County District Court

NPEA District Court Filing

Hot Sheets (6/23): If You Want to Destroy My Sweater

Restraining/Protection Order Violation (Aiding and Abetting)

Megan Louise Cole: Restraining/Protection Order Violation (Aiding and Abetting)

Hunter Russell McGinnis: Attempted Escape

Hunter Russell McGinnis: Attempted Escape

Eric Wayne Moses: Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor, Driving Under Revocation

Eric Wayne Moses: Contributing to the Delinquency of a Minor, Driving Under Revocation

Luke Christian Ressegieu: Disturbing the Peace

Luke Christian Ressegieu: Disturbing the Peace

Timoty George Wade: Restraining/Protection Order Violation

Timothy George Wade: Restraining/Protection Order Violation

Click Here To See Past Hot Sheets

This information is not a criminal history. Criminal charges are often dropped or reduced. All individuals included in this post are presumed innocent of crimes until proven guilty in a court of law. The North Platte Post assumes no legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, or completeness, of this information. Any person who believes information provided is not accurate may submit a complaint to admin@northplattepost.com.

North Platte Weather-June 23


forecast graphic june 23 2015Today: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 9am. Mostly sunny, with a high near 80. Southeast wind 5 to 9 mph.
Tonight: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly between 10pm and 4am. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 59. East wind 6 to 11 mph.
Wednesday: A 10 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms before 7am. Mostly sunny, with a high near 88. East wind around 6 mph becoming calm in the afternoon.
Wednesday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 64. Northeast wind around 7 mph.
Thursday: Partly sunny, with a high near 82. East northeast wind 7 to 10 mph.
Thursday Night: A 30 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 61.
Friday: A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 79.
Friday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 57.

NP Woman Charged with Vehicle Theft, DUI

Terri Bray

Terri Bray

A 44-year-old North Platte woman has been accused of stealing a car and taking it on a drunken joy ride.

At around 2:30 p.m., on June 20, North Platte Police responded to the 1400 block of East 12th Street on the report of a stolen vehicle.

According to a witness, a female, later identified as Terri Bray, was standing on a corner in the 1400 block of East 13th Street earlier in the day and had attempted to wave him down.

The victim said he did not stop and left the area.  He stated that when he returned home a short time later, he saw Bray seated inside his neighbor’s Honda CRX.

He said Bray then revved the engine and erratically drove away from the area.

Police say the 30-year-old son of the vehicle’s owner was able to follow the stolen car.

Officers then observed the vehicle stopped in the intersection of Meyers and 12th Streets and made contact with Bray.

According to Officer Rodney Brown, officers suspected Bray was under the influence of alcohol and took her into custody.

Following further investigation, Bray was transported to the Lincoln County Detention Center and jailed on charges of felony theft of a motor vehicle, refusal to submit to a breath test and 2nd offense driving under the influence of liquor.

She was also cited for not having an operator’s license.

Group Unveils Ads Aimed at Death Penalty Petition Drive

signing-petitionLINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A group that opposes Nebraska’s death penalty petition drive has released two television ads urging voters not to sign a petition that seeks to put the issue on the 2016 ballot.

Nebraskans for Public Safety posted the ads on social media on Monday and said they will run on television starting Tuesday.

The ads feature Nebraska voters Martha Brown, Timorree Adams Klinger and state Sen. Colby Coash of Lincoln, a conservative who led the repeal effort in the Legislature this year.

Danielle Conrad, a spokeswoman for the group, says the death penalty is broken and should left in the past. Nebraska last executed an inmate in 1997.

The ads can be viewed online at http://bit.ly/1SDB1wL .

The group Nebraskans for the Death Penalty has until Aug. 27 to gather signatures.

NP Woman Accused of Striking Boyfriend with Lamp

Lori Bell

Lori Bell

A 51-year-old North Platte woman is facing a felony charge after she allegedly assaulted her boyfriend.

At around 7:30 a.m., on June 21, North Platte Police responded to the report of an assault in the 800 block of West 3rd Street.

Officer met with a 55-year-old male who alleged that, following an argument, Lori Bell had begun slapping him while he was sleeping, then grabbed a lamp and struck him over the head.

Following further investigation, officers placed Bell under arrest and charged her with felony domestic assault.

She was jailed at the Lincoln County Detention Center.

 

City of NP to Continue Spraying for Mosquitoes

mosquitoDue to the weather conditions last week, areas not sprayed for mosquitoes will be rescheduled.

The city of North Platte will be treating these areas for mosquitoes in town the week of June 22nd thru June 26th.
Tuesday: 2nd Street to “A” Street, 2nd Street to Burlington Blvd. and
South Platte River south to State Farm Road.

Wednesday:  “A” Street to Philip Street and Burlington Blvd. to Phillip Street.

All East and West boundaries will be the city limits

Treatment will begin at 8:00 P.M. and end approximately at 12 Midnight, weather permitting. Residents living in these areas are asked to take precautions by turning off window fans, and closing windows and doors through
these evening hours.

Hot Sheets (6/22): Dude, Open a Window

Alex Russell Bowman: Fugitive from Justice-Keith County

Alex Russell Bowman: Fugitive from Justice-Keith County

Jeremy J. Burke: 3rd-Degree Assault

Jeremy J. Burke: 3rd-Degree Assault

LaTosha Mary Ryan: Drug Court Noncompliance

LaTosha Mary Ryan: Drug Court Noncompliance

Richard Perry Sweeney: Driving Under the Influence of Liquor

Richard Perry Sweeney: Driving Under the Influence of Liquor

Click Here To See Past Hot Sheets

This information is not a criminal history. Criminal charges are often dropped or reduced. All individuals included in this post are presumed innocent of crimes until proven guilty in a court of law. The North Platte Post assumes no legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, or completeness, of this information. Any person who believes information provided is not accurate may submit a complaint to admin@northplattepost.com.